thisistheverge
thisistheverge:

Play this: ‘Super Planet Crash’ tests your god mode Sometimes, it’s easy to forget what a serendipitous marvel our universe really is. At least, until you’ve tried building your own. Super Planet Crash is a browser-based simulation that requires players to forge a planetary system capable of surviving at least 500 years. The interface is simple: left-click to place up to 11 astronomical objects of varying sizes anywhere within the defined limits. What makes it challenging is how the gravitational field of each celestial body affects others around it. Even a single dwarf star can throw everything out of orbit.

thisistheverge:

Play this: ‘Super Planet Crash’ tests your god mode
Sometimes, it’s easy to forget what a serendipitous marvel our universe really is. At least, until you’ve tried building your own. Super Planet Crash is a browser-based simulation that requires players to forge a planetary system capable of surviving at least 500 years. The interface is simple: left-click to place up to 11 astronomical objects of varying sizes anywhere within the defined limits. What makes it challenging is how the gravitational field of each celestial body affects others around it. Even a single dwarf star can throw everything out of orbit.

ilovecharts
hipsterlibertarian:

From Reason:

The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s plan to tag and track us all is going swimmingly, from a creepy, voyeuristic perspective, according to federal documents. Released by the FBI in response to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the records reveal plans to stick the mugs of almost one in six Americans into the Next Generation Identification (NGI) program’s facial recognition database by next year.
Combined with the more than 120 million faces in state databases and the feds’ tolerance for a remarkably high false-positive rate, your chances of getting fingered for somebody else’s misdeeds are getting pretty good.

hipsterlibertarian:

From Reason:

The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s plan to tag and track us all is going swimmingly, from a creepy, voyeuristic perspective, according to federal documents. Released by the FBI in response to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the records reveal plans to stick the mugs of almost one in six Americans into the Next Generation Identification (NGI) program’s facial recognition database by next year.

Combined with the more than 120 million faces in state databases and the feds’ tolerance for a remarkably high false-positive rate, your chances of getting fingered for somebody else’s misdeeds are getting pretty good.